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Chevrolet S-10 Truck—
Chapter 1 from the V-8 Conversion Manual:

INTRODUCTION



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Chapter 1 Contents:

Introduction ••• 1984 S-10 2WD Truck with 1989 305 TPI/700-R4 ••• Project ZZ3—Our Quickest Truck ••• 1984 S-10 Blazer with 1985 305 TPI/700-R4 •••

Baby Thunder, 1992 S-10 4X4 Truck with 1992 Corvette LT1 Engine ••• ZZ3 Update ••• Another Update ••• 1995 Camaro LT1/4L60-E into 1988 2wd S-10 Blazer •••

V8 Alternative for 1996–2000 Trucks with the 4.3 V6 ••• Measurements ••• Typical Conversion Costs ••• Time Requirements •••

 

BABY THUNDER, 1992 S-10 4X4 TRUCK WITH 1992 CORVETTE LT1 ENGINE

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This was built by GM wizard, Scott Leon, at the General Motors Arizona proving grounds. The detail and workmanship on this conversion are first rate and nearly all of the conversion was done with GM parts. The elbow from the throttle-body to the air-cleaner is custom made, and it is a work of art. It is actually made from a few accumulators for the air-conditioner. We can¬t begin to guess how many hours went into making that piece. Stealth Conversions now has a 90 rubber elbow that performs the same functions (see ducting on truck on page 1-4).

Even when using an LT1 engine, this swap is similar to what we recommend. However, the Corvette LT1 engine accessories (air conditioning, power-steering pump, alternator) and brackets must be used for this swap. The accessories used on the Camaro LT1 will not fit the S-Truck 4X4 chassis, but they will fit a 2wd chassis (see chapter 7).

This engine swap is slightly different than what we recommend in that the transmission and transfer case remain in their stock location. The driveshafts remain stock and the evaporator cover remains stock. No modifications were required on the firewall or transmisson tunnel. For cooling, two 150 watt (12 amps) GM fans were mounted in front of the radiator and the 1992 grille was modified for fan clearance. These appear adequate for moderate weather conditions. Remember, the only reason we recommend moving the engine rearward is for improved cooling. Moving the engine rearward requires modifications to the driveshafts, evaporator cover, firewall, transmission tunnel, and shift linkage, but we feel it is necessary with an air-conditioned V8.

Due to the air cleaner position, the 4.3 V6 radiator was offset to the driver's side a couple of inches, and a small battery, group size 70 replaced the larger, group size 78 battery.

The engine compartment of "Baby Thunder" is packed full of options and accessories. The fourwheel-anti-lock-brake module takes up a good amount of space. The cruise control, remote oil filter, and the remote power steering reservoir take up even more space. The hose fittings on the air-conditioning compressor were tig welded to route the hoses downward through a small amount of available space. This swap was no small feat.

Due to the "forward" positioning of the engine, the stock 4.3 V6 radiator tank did not allow room for the LT1¬s upper radiator hose. The side tank on the 4.3 S-10 radiator was replaced with the side tank from a 1990-1991 Pontiac Grand Am, GM part #52452789, and a couple of radiator hoses were spliced together to make the upper hose.

If the engine was set back 1 inch, and the radiator mounted forward 1/2 inch as we recommend, a stock 4.3 V6 radiator could probably be used, and a pair of thin 12" electric cooling fans could be installed behind the radiator, as was done on the truck shown on page 1-16. In addition, if the engine was offset towards the passenger's side, an offset oil filter adapter (see page 3-10) could be used instead of the remote oil filter, freeing up some more space. Still, another option is to use the cooling system that was installed on the LT1 powered Blazer shown on page 1-24 and 1-25.

A throttle-body from a 1993 Camaro LT1 engine was installed onto the 1992 Corvette engine. This was done because the throttle-body used on the Corvette has no provisions for the transmission¬s throttle valve cable and cruise control. Those cables are attached to the traction control module that comes standard on all LT1 Corvettes

 

Chapter 1, Baby Thunder, is continued on the next page.

Chapter 1 Contents:

Introduction ••• 1984 S-10 2WD Truck with 1989 305 TPI/700-R4 ••• Project ZZ3—Our Quickest Truck ••• 1984 S-10 Blazer with 1985 305 TPI/700-R4 •••

Baby Thunder, 1992 S-10 4X4 Truck with 1992 Corvette LT1 Engine ••• ZZ3 Update ••• Another Update ••• 1995 Camaro LT1/4L60-E into 1988 2wd S-10 Blazer •••

V8 Alternative for 1996–2000 Trucks with the 4.3 V6 ••• Measurements ••• Typical Conversion Costs ••• Time Requirements •••


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